Knowledge-Based Systems for Supporting Clinical Nursing Decisions

  • Judy G. Ozbolt
Part of the Computers in Health Care book series (HI)

Abstract

The development of decision-support systems for nursing has been limited by difficulties in defining and representing nursing’s knowledge base and by a lack of knowledge about how nurses make decisions. Recent theoretical and empirical work offers solutions to these problems. The challenge now is to represent nursing knowledge in a way that is comprehensible to both nurse and computer, and to design decision-support modalities that are accurate, efficient, and appropriate for nurses with different levels of expertise. In this chapter are reviewed the issues and progress in developing knowledge-based systems for supporting clinical nursing decisions, critically evaluating the logic programming language Prolog as a tool for meeting the challenge.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judy G. Ozbolt

There are no affiliations available

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