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Lasers for Machining

  • George Chryssolouris
Part of the Mechanical Engineering Series book series (MES)

Abstract

The laser is clearly the most critical component of any laser machining system. This chapter provides an overview of the operation of the various types of lasers used in machining. First, the basic mechanisms required to produce laser light, such as stimulation, amplification, and population inversion are explained. The unique properties of laser light, including monochromacity, coherence, diffraction, and radiance are also described. Lasers can be classified by the type of lasing medium used: solid, liquid or gas. The beam each type of laser produces has a characteristic wavelength and power range. The most common types of lasers used for machining are CO2, Nd:YAG, and excimer lasers. Possible configurations for these three laser types are detailed.

Keywords

Laser Beam Excimer Laser High Power Laser Population Inversion Laser Machine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Chryssolouris
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Manufacturing and ProductivityMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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