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Dynamic Conservation Management of Mediterranean Landscapes

  • Zev Naveh
  • Arthur S. Lieberman
Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

The sclerophyll forest zone (SFZ) of mediterranean climates covers all those regions that exhibit similar climatic characteristics of warm to hot dry summers, with high solar irradiation and high rates of evaporation, and mild to cool wet winters with low solar irradiation and low rates of evaporation. In these conditions, broad-leaved and mostly evergreen trees and shrubs with thick, but mostly small, leathery leaves, reach their optimum development and distribution. Forests dominated by such plants are considered the zonal vegetation. Köppen (1923) called this the olive climate because around the Mediterranean Basin the distribution of the (cultivated) olive tree—a typical broad-leaved evergreen sclerophyll tree—corresponds quite well with this climate type.

Keywords

Dwarf Shrub Fire Hazard Mediterranean Ecosystem Fire Ignition Coastal Sage Scrub 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zev Naveh
    • 1
  • Arthur S. Lieberman
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Agricultural EngineeringTechnion—Israel Institute of TechnologyHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Landscape Architecture Program, New York State College of Agriculture and Life SciencesCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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