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Beyond the Biomedical Model: Integration of Psychosocial and Cultural Orientations

  • C. Kent Smith
  • Arthur Kleinman

Abstract

Almost no one would dispute the fact that biomedicine has made striking advances over the last several decades. From the polio vaccine to the CT scan, test tube babies, and immunogenetic black magic, biomedicine continues to sweep forward at an accelerating rate. At the same time it has become apparent that technologic medicine alone is not adequate for treating the startling variety of maladies to which human beings are subject. At the other end of the spectrum, psychiatry and other behavioral and social sciences are attempting to deal with the bewildering variety of mental illnesses and life stresses associated with our modern society. It is equally apparent to practicing physicians that the behavioral sciences alone are not adequate for treating the majority of their sick patients. Rather, what is needed is a satisfactory way to integrate knowledge from biomedicine, the behavioral sciences, and the social sciences to provide a more comprehensive and effective treatment approach, thereby enhancing favorable outcomes and minimizing the impact of disease. A number of efforts to blend techniques from various disciplines have been reported in recent years. Some understanding of past work in this area gives perspective and increased meaning to the newer conceptual models.

Keywords

Family Physician Cultural Orientation Cultural Influence Psychosomatic Medicine Illness Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Kent Smith
  • Arthur Kleinman

There are no affiliations available

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