Family Medicine pp 1093-1100 | Cite as

Career Alternatives

  • Daniel J. Ostergaard

Abstract

A multiplicity of career alternatives awaits the family physician graduating from a family practice residency program today. Fully trained family physicians are in great demand for practice as well as nonpractice situations. Full specialty status attached to broad based education uniquely qualifies family physicians for several different roles.

Keywords

Expense Resi Dian Mili 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. Ostergaard

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