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Sepsis pp 101-137 | Cite as

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbation

  • Guillermo Domínguez-Cherit
  • Delia Borunda Nava

Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the only leading cause of death with a rising prevalence It is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and accounts for approximately 500,000 hospitalizations and 110,000 deaths for exacerbations each year. Patients who are admitted to the intensive care unite (ICU) for COPD exacerbations have an in-hospital mortality of 24%.1–4 It has been estimated that by the year 2020, COPD will be fifth among the conditions that will be the most burden to society.5

Keywords

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Acute Exacerbation Chronic Bronchitis Acute Respiratory Failure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guillermo Domínguez-Cherit
  • Delia Borunda Nava

There are no affiliations available

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