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Extreme Vertebroplasty: Techniques for Treating Difficult Lesions

  • John D. Barr
  • John M. Mathis

Abstract

For most patients, the standard techniques for performing percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) work very well. However, for patients with malignant disease causing severe cortical destruction, the usual techniques may be associated with a high incidence of cement extravasation and complications. Osteoporotic patients presenting with very severe vertebral body compression also represent a treatment challenge. Modification of the usual techniques may provide an alternative that allows better treatment for patients of both these types.

Keywords

Vertebral Body Needle Placement Cement Leak Vertebral Body Height Cement Injection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • John D. Barr
  • John M. Mathis

There are no affiliations available

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