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Cathecolaminergic Neurons in the Olfactory Bulb

  • Kazunori Toida
  • Katsuko Kosaka
  • Yusuke Aika
  • Toshio Kosaka
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 53)

Abstract

The olfactory bulb (OB) is an expedient region for analyzing neuronal organization in the central nervous system, as it displays a simple and distinctly laminar cytoarchitecture consisting of a relatively small number of neuron types, but is also so rich in chemical and neuroactive substances located in a variety of neuron types in distinct layers.1

Keywords

Tyrosine Hydroxylase Olfactory Bulb Olfactory Nerve Glomerular Layer Accessory Olfactory Bulb 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazunori Toida
    • 1
    • 2
  • Katsuko Kosaka
    • 2
  • Yusuke Aika
    • 2
  • Toshio Kosaka
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy and Cell BiologyThe University of Tokushima School of MedicineTokushimaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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