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Melatonin, Nitric Oxide Synthase and Oxidative Stress: Implications in Aging

  • D. K. Lahiri
  • Y-.W. Ge
  • J. I. NurnbergerJr.
  • E. Y. Yang
  • S. C. Bondy
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 53)

Abstract

Age-related changes in cerebral functions are believed to be partially due to an imbalance between pro-oxidant and antioxidant factors.1 To compensate for this imbalance, dietary supplementation with various antioxidant agents is being tested.2 We have been studying the neuroprotective and biochemical role of melatonin.3 Melatonin, an indoleamine derivative of serotonin, is synthesized within the pineal body, and melatonin levels in the plasma have been noted to decrease with age.4 The effects of addition of melatonin to the diet over an extended time have been studied with emphasis on age-related changes in two indices of oxidant activity: the rate of formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Ages of mice that reflected middle adulthood and pre-senescent periods rather than stages of early development or extreme age were selected.

Keywords

Reactive Oxygen Species Basal Diet Mouse Brain Extract Treatment Reactive Oxygen Species Cerebellar Extract 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. K. Lahiri
    • 1
  • Y-.W. Ge
    • 1
  • J. I. NurnbergerJr.
    • 1
  • E. Y. Yang
    • 2
  • S. C. Bondy
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Psychiatric ResearchIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Community and Environmental MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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