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Dynamic Monitoring of Neurological Diseases by CSF Clinical Markers

  • Hasan Parvez
  • Shahid Baig
  • Catherine Collin
  • Ali Qureshi
  • Simone Parvez
  • Claude Reiss
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 53)

Abstract

Neurological symptoms and neurodegeneration are silent features of many neuropathological conditions. These include acute metabolic and physiological insult, chronic motor and dementia disorders as well as inflammatory diseases represting important causes of morbidity and mortality in humans. Studies dining the last decade have provided convincing evidence that numerous neuroactive molecules play a vital role in chemical signaling and neurodegenerative processes of the nervous system.1 These substances before mainly represented putative transmitters and neuropeptides. Investigations on oxidative stress involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (NOS) are now largely believed to be in part responsible for the induction of neurogenic lesions not only by producing neurotoxins but also leading to DNA adduct formation.2 The interdependence of neuropeptide/neurotransmitter pathways and their co-existence in the same neuron is a tremendous advance to understand how neurosecretion can control the processes of transmitter synthesis, release and metabolism. Receptor active opioid peptides in human brain were demonstrated more than 20 years ago.3 Regardless of our advance knowledge on the neurochemitsry of neuropeptide/neurotransmitter and free radicals, it still remains extremely difficult to have a precise diagnosis of the early onset of neurodegenerative processes and only the post-mortem histopathological and laboratory tests can provide the true neuropathological picture.

Keywords

Multiple Sclerosis Reactive Nitrogen Species Pernicious Anemia Aseptic Meningitis Neurodegenerative Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hasan Parvez
    • 1
  • Shahid Baig
    • 2
  • Catherine Collin
    • 1
  • Ali Qureshi
    • 3
  • Simone Parvez
    • 4
  • Claude Reiss
    • 1
  1. 1.Neuroendocrinologie & Neuropharmacologie du DéveloppementCNRS-Institut Alfred Fessard de NeurosciencesGif Sur YvetteFrance
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyAgha Khan Medical CollegeKarachiPakistan
  3. 3.Department of Clinical NeuroscienceHuddinge University HospitalNovumSweden
  4. 4.Laboratoire de Neuroendocrinologie du DéveloppementUFR SciencesUniversité de Reims, UFR SciencesReimsFrance

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