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Abstract

The subject of radiation biology deals with the effects of ionizing radiations on living systems. During the passage through living matter, radiation loses energy by interaction with atoms and molecules of the matter, thereby causing ionization and excitation. The ultimate effect is the alteration of the living cells. Radiation biology is a vast subject, and it is beyond the scope of this book to include the full details of the subject. The following is only a brief outline of radiation biology, highlighting the mechanism of radiation damage, radiosensitivity of tissues, different types of its effect on living matter, and risks of cancer and genetic effects from radiation exposure.

Keywords

Dose Rate Radiation Damage Chromosome Aberration Radiation Biology Nuclear Medicine Procedure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gopal B. Saha
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear MedicineThe Cleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA

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