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Selection of Elderly Patients for Transplantation

  • John B. Dossetor

Abstract

Transplanted organs are a precious commodity for which there is increasing demand. There is also an ever-widening gap between the need for organs and our capacity to meet that need. The waiting lists are increasing, and the gap between need and supply is also increasing, as seen in Figure 67.1. The situation is similar in all countries where programs exist for the transplantation of solid organs. The data shown are for kidney failure, but the overall transplant data are similar. In this chapter, the discussion is confined to cadaveric organ transplants, as live donor transplants are seldom used for the elderly.

Keywords

Graft Survival Transplant Outcome Transplant Program Transplant Team Cadaveric Renal Transplantation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • John B. Dossetor

There are no affiliations available

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