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Orthopedic Injuries

  • Jeffrey H. Richmond
  • Kenneth J. Koval
  • Joseph D. Zuckerman

Abstract

Orthopedic injuries in the elderly are a major challenge in geriatric medicine. This rapidly growing segment of the population sustains a disproportionate number of fractures and, more than other age groups, requires treatment tailored to the needs of the entire patient, not just the fracture itself. As with all orthopedic care, the goal of treatment in the elderly is to restore or improve on their preinjury level of function. However, a fracture superimposed on the combination of preexisting physical infirmities and systemic medical problems often makes for a tenuous ability to maintain independent living status. Immobilization of an extremity or dependence, even temporarily, on a walker or crutches can render a patient unable to manage independently and so require institutional care. Consideration of this point is mandatory when planning the treatment of any orthopedic injury in the elderly.

Keywords

Femoral Neck Femoral Neck Fracture Distal Radius Fracture Ankle Fracture Proximal Humeral Fracture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey H. Richmond
  • Kenneth J. Koval
  • Joseph D. Zuckerman

There are no affiliations available

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