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A Review of Circumcision in New Zealand

I never liked doing them and I was pleased to give them up
  • Ken McGrath
  • Hugh Young
Chapter

Abstract

New Zealand’s highly conformist Caucasian society rapidly adopted routine circumcision of children during World War II, taking it to one of the highest rates in the Western World. In contrast, the native Maori population avoided it altogether. During the late 1960s, the practice was given up precipitously, but not as quickly as in the United Kingdom. By the late 1970s, circumcision of Caucasian children had dropped below 1% only to be replaced by an influx of circumcising immigrants. This paper presents a short history of New Zealand’s brief flirtation with medical mythology and the curious dichotomy that now exists to confront human rights.

Keywords

National Health Service Female Genital Mutilation Maternity Unit Infant Male Circumcision Neonatal Circumcision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ken McGrath
    • 1
  • Hugh Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Health StudiesAuckland University of TechnologyNew Zealand

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