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Unemployment Insurance: Lessons from Canada

  • Morley Gunderson
  • W. Craig Riddell
Chapter

Abstract

As countries engage in greater economic integration, programs like unemployment insurance (UI) become subject to increased public scrutiny and policy analysis. This is true both in countries that have an extensive history and involvement with UI, and in countries that have little or no history with such programs, or that are contemplating their implementation.1

Keywords

Unemployment Rate Unemployment Insurance Human Resource Development Labor Market Policy Occupational Choice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morley Gunderson
  • W. Craig Riddell

There are no affiliations available

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