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Canadian vs. American Labor Markets in a Context of Economic Integration and Structural Adjustment

  • Morley Gunderson
  • Albert Berry
  • Clark Reynolds
Chapter

Abstract

Canadians compare themselves in many ways with their neighbors to the south, including the functioning and outcomes of the two labor markets. The latter comparisons can be quite informative; together with the many similarities between the two systems there are interesting differences, which help analysts to understand how structural and policy differences show up in different outcomes. Many of the similarities illustrate the way advanced industrialized countries function; the differences highlight how labor market outcomes may depend on policies in areas such as income maintenance programs, adjustment assistance and legislation, and on the different size of the two economies. The contrasts may also be informative in the light of Canada’s many similarities with Latin American countries (size, primary export orientation, focus of trade with a single large trading partner). As such, the Canadian experience may be of considerable relevance to Latin American countries, especially those already embarked on (Mexico) or contemplating trade liberalization with the United States (most of the rest), whether through accession to NAFTA or to other trade agreements.

Keywords

Labor Market Total Factor Productivity Latin American Country Trade Liberalization Structural Adjustment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morley Gunderson
  • Albert Berry
  • Clark Reynolds

There are no affiliations available

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