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Infectious Diseases

  • Keith B. Armitage
  • Gary I. Sinclair

Abstract

Rural Americans may experience a variety of infections that are rare or unusual in urban or suburban dwellers. Rural dwellers are more likely to have occupations (e.g., agriculture) or avocations (e.g., hunting, trapping) that expose them to microbes carried by animals and insects (Donham & Mutel, 1982). They are more likely to be exposed to untreated or contaminated water due to poverty or underdeveloped water and sanitation systems. Most physicians and other health care professionals train in urban or suburban setting, and may have little or no experience with infectious diseases occurring in rural dwellers. Both classic infectious diseases rarely seen in the modern era (e.g., plague, anthrax) and new and emerging diseases (e.g., Hantavirus sp.) are most often encountered in rural settings.

Keywords

Lyme Disease Rural Dweller Clinical Infectious Disease Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Amebic Liver Abscess 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith B. Armitage
    • 1
  • Gary I. Sinclair
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Infectious DiseasesCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  2. 2.School of MedicineCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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