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P Values and Multiple Endpoints I: Pernicious Abstractions?

  • Lemuel A. Moyé

Abstract

In a large clinical trial, thousands and sometimes tens of thousands of patients are followed for years. This effort generates hundreds of thousands of data points, carefully collected, verified, entered and analyzed by many workers, themselves committing thousands of hours to this task. Is all of this effort for just a single p value?

Keywords

Primary Endpoint Secondary Endpoint Total Mortality Trial Endpoint Global Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lemuel A. Moyé
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthUniversity of TexasHoustonUSA

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