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Alcoholism: An Introduction

  • Marc A. Schuckit
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine are the most widely used drugs in Western civilizations, and alcohol is the most acutely destructive of the three.1 Probably reflecting this preeminence of alcohol, there is a great deal of information available on the epidemiology, the natural history, and the treatment of alcohol-related disorders. Thus, alcohol is used in this text as a prototype for the discussion of other pharmacological agents. Information on alcohol is presented in three chapters: this chapter covers the pharmacology of alcohol, definitional problems surrounding this drug, the epidemiology of drinking patterns and problems, the natural history of alcoholism, and some data on etiology. Chapter 4 is an overview of treatment of acute problems. Finally, chapter 15 offers information on rehabilitation of the alcoholic.

Keywords

Experimental Research Alcohol Dependence Major Depressive Disorder Alcohol Withdrawal Antisocial Personality Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc A. Schuckit
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California Medical School and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare SystemSan DiegoUSA

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