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Over-the-Counter (OTC) Drugs and Some Prescription Drugs

  • Marc A. Schuckit
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Almost any substance has the potential for misuse (if we define this as the voluntary intake to the point of causing physical or psychological harm). As discussed in chapter 1, this potential is especially true if the drug alters an individual’s perception of his environment. In that context, this chapter presents data on the misuse of over-the-counter (OTC) medications and some prescription drugs, including the antiparkinsonian medications, diuretics, and antipsychotics.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Prescription Drug Antipsychotic Drug Major Depressive Disorder Motion Sickness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc A. Schuckit
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California Medical School and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare SystemSan DiegoUSA

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