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EPIC-Italy

A Molecular Epidemiology Project on Diet and Cancer
  • Domenico Palli
  • Vittorio Krogh
  • Antonio Russo
  • Franco Berrino
  • Salvatore Panico
  • Rosario Tumino
  • Paolo Vineis
  • EPIC-Italy
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 472)

Abstract

Examination of epidemiological and experimental studies concerning dietary habits/constituents and cancer risk reveals a substantial body of evidence supporting the hypothesis that diet plays an important role in the occurrence of some types of cancer.1,2,3,4 Research on nutrition and cancer has developed substantially over the past 20-years, initially stimulated by a number of ecological studies which drew attention to the large world-wide variations in cancer incidence, suggesting that these variations could be related to differences in diet and lifestyle among populations.5 The most consistent result so far is that a diet rich in vegetables and fruit is associated with lower cancer risk.6,7,8,9 Various hypotheses have been put forward to explain why consumption of vegetables and fruit is associated with a reduced risk of cancer. Despite the current difficulty of identifying active anti-carcinogens, the accumulation of epidemiological studies lends strength to the observed association between vegetables and fruit intake and lower cancer risk.

Keywords

Fruit Intake European Prospective Investigation Dietary Questionnaire Vegetable Fruit Lower Cancer Risk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Domenico Palli
    • 1
  • Vittorio Krogh
    • 2
  • Antonio Russo
    • 1
  • Franco Berrino
    • 2
  • Salvatore Panico
    • 3
  • Rosario Tumino
    • 4
  • Paolo Vineis
    • 5
  • EPIC-Italy
  1. 1.Sez. Epidemiologia Analitica, U.O. EpidemiologiaCSPO—Azienda Ospedaliera CareggiFirenzeItaly
  2. 2.Divisione di EpidemiologiaIstituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei TumoriMilanoItaly
  3. 3.Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e SperimentaleUniversità Federico IINapoliItaly
  4. 4.Registro dei Tumori della Provincia di RagusaAzienda Ospedaliera Civile M.P. ArezzoRagusaItaly
  5. 5.Servizio di Epidemiologia dei Tumori, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Oncologia UmanaUniversità di TorinoTorinoItaly

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