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Agricultural Biotechnology and the Poor: The Role of Development Assistance Agencies

  • Gesa Horstkotte-Wesseler
  • Derek Byerlee
Chapter

Abstract

This paper reviews the funding mechanisms for agricultural biotechnology and the current funding strategies of selected development assistance agencies. After examining the objectives and constraints of donors, options are discussed for enhancing their roles in biotechnology research and development (R&D) for the poor. If developing countries want to avail themselves of biotechnology’s promise, they clearly need to integrate it within their own innovation systems. This should be done in accordance with their own priorities, through partnerships with advanced research institutes, private companies and regional cooperation. They need to build capacities not only in biotechnology R&D but also in associated regulatory and policy frameworks designed to ensure safe and efficient technology use. This will require strong public-sector support, both from developing-country governments and from donors, who have played a major role in developing agricultural R&D capacity in these countries over the past four decades.

Keywords

Agricultural Biotechnology Rockefeller Foundation International Agricultural Research External Assistance Donor Support 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gesa Horstkotte-Wesseler
  • Derek Byerlee

There are no affiliations available

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