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Nursing Aspects of Health Information Systems

  • Kathryn J. Hannah
  • Marion J. Ball
  • Margaret J. A. Edwards
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

Motivation for the development and implementation of computerized hospital information systems has been financial and administrative, i.e., driven by the need to capture charges and document patient care for legal reasons The majority of systems marketed today have been motivated by those two factors. Historically, such systems have required a major investment in hardware (typically a mainframe), and, even though they have demonstrated significant improvement in hospital communications (with a corresponding reduction in paper flow), they have been characteristically weak in supporting professional nursing practice. These factors have prevented the level of acceptance by nurses that was originally foreseen. Only recently have developers and vendors begun to consider the nature of modern nursing practice and its information processing requirements (see Figure 6.1).

Keywords

National Health Service Decision Support System Hospital Information System Health Information System Unify Medical Language System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn J. Hannah
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marion J. Ball
    • 3
    • 4
  • Margaret J. A. Edwards
    • 5
  1. 1.Health InformaticsSierra Systems Consultants, Inc.CalgaryCanada
  2. 2.Department of Community Health Science, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineUSA
  4. 4.First Consulting GroupBaltimoreUSA
  5. 5.Margaret J.A. Edwards and Associates, Inc.CalgaryCanada

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