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Eye Movements During Free Search on a Homogenous Background

  • Ulrich Nies
  • Dieter Heller
  • Ralph Radach
  • Birgit Bedenk
Chapter

Abstract

Searching for small targets within a large homogenous area is common to many quality control tasks, where inspectors have to detect irregularities in industrial products (Bloomfield 1975; Megaw and Richardson 1979). For example in CRT manufacturing, inspectors have to search for a large variety of flaws, e.g. bubbles and stones, differing in contrast, size and appearance. The minimal diameter for irregularities that have to be identified is 0.4 mm. The inspector’s task is difficult because of low target visibility, homogeneity of the glass surface and the short time allowed for inspection. The aim of the present research was to identify visuomotor and perceptual determinants of search performance as a base to design training programs for improvement.

Keywords

Visual Search Fixation Cross Search Performance Homogenous Background Target Eccentricity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ulrich Nies
    • 1
  • Dieter Heller
    • 1
  • Ralph Radach
    • 1
  • Birgit Bedenk
    • 1
  1. 1.Technical University of AachenAachenGermany

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