Advertisement

Opposing Resistance to the Head Movement Does not Affect Space Perception During Head Rotations

  • Jean Blouin
  • Nicolas Amade
  • Jean-Louis Vercher
  • Gabriel Gauthier
Chapter

Abstract

The neural encoding of the visual space is still a central issue in the general field of neurophysiology and psychophysiology. Many questions tickle the curiosity of the researchers in the face of spectacular daily spatial performance. Among the current questions that authors attempt to solve is how the central nervous system (CNS) updates the egocentric position of objects from the environment during self-motion? What is the nature of the cues that individuals rely on to determine the new position of objects with respect to the body after such displacements? How is the heterogeneous sensory information centrally processed to provide an uniformed and coherent representation of the extracorporeal world?

Keywords

Head Movement Target Position Head Rotation Neck Muscle Efference Copy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abrahams, VC, Richmond, FJR (1988) Specialization of sensorimotor organization in the neck muscle system. Prog Brain Res 76: 125–135PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Berthoz A, Israel I, Georges-Francois P, Grasso R, Tsuzuku T (1996)! Spatial memory of body linear displacement: what is being stored? Science 269: 95–98CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Berthoz A, Israel I, Vieville T, Zee D (1987) Linear head displacement measured by the otoliths can be reproduced through the saccadic system. Neurosci Lett 82: 285–290PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Biguer B, Prablanc C, Jeannerod M (1984) The contribution of coordinated eye and head movements in hand ponting accuracy. Exp Brain Res 55: 462–469PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bloomberg J, Melvill Jones G, Segal B (1991) Adaptive modification of vestibularly perceived rotation. Exp Brain Res 84: 47–56PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Blouin J, Bard C, Teasdale N, Paillard J, Fleury M, Forget R, Lamarre Y (1993) Reference systems for coding spatial information in normal subjects and a deafferented patient. Exp Brain Res 93: 324–331PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Blouin J, Gauthier GM, van Donkelaar P, Vercher J-L (1995a) Encoding the position of a flashed visual target after passive body rotations. Neuroreport 6: 1165–1168PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Blouin J, Gauthier GM, Vercher J-L (1997) Visual object localization through vestibular and neck inputs. 2: Updating off-mid-sagital-plane target positions. J Vest Res 7: 137–143CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Blouin J, Labrousse L, Simoneau M, Vercher J-L, Gauthier GM (in press b) Updating visual space during passive and voluntary head-in-space movements. Exp Brain ResGoogle Scholar
  10. Blouin J, Okada T, Wolsley C, Bronstein A (in press a) Encoding target-trunk relative position: cervical vs. vestibular contribution. Exp Brain ResGoogle Scholar
  11. Blouin J, Vercher J-L, Gauthier GM, Paillard J, Bard C, Lamarre Y (1995b) Perception of passive whole-body rotation in the absence of neck and body proprioception. J Neurophysiol 74: 2216–2219PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Cohen LA (1960) Role of eye and neck proprioceptive mechanisms in body orientation and motor coordination. J Neurophysiol 24: 1–11Google Scholar
  13. Deecke L, Schwartz DWF, Fredrickson JM (1977) Vestibular responses in the rhesus monkey ventroposterior thalamus. II. Vestibulo-proprioceptive convergence at thalamic neurons. Exp Brain Res 30: 219–232PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Gandevia SC, McCloskey DI, Burke D (1992) Kinaesthetic signals and muscle contraction. Trends Neurosci 15: 62–65PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Grigg P, Greenspan BJ (1977) Response of primate joint afferent neurons to mechanical stimulation of kee joint. J Neurophysiol 40: 1–8PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Israel I, Bronstein AM, Kanayama R, Faldon M, Gresty M (1996) Exp Brain Res 112: 411–119PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Israel I, Sievering D, Koenig E (1995) Self-rotation estimate about the vertical axis. Acta Oto-laryngol 115: 3–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Jeannerod M (1991) The interaction of visual and proprioceptive cues in controlling reaching movements. In: Humphrey DR, Freund H J (eds) Motor control: concepts and issues. John Wiley & Sons, New York, pp 277–291Google Scholar
  19. Maurer C, Kimmig H, Trefzer A, Mergner T (1997) Visual object localization through vestibular and neck inputs. 1 : Localization in space and relative to the head and trunk mid-sagittal planes. J Vestib Res 7: 119–135PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Mergner T, Rottler G, Kimmig H, Becker W (1992) Role of vestibular and neck inputs for the perception of object motion in space. Exp Brain Res 89: 655–668PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Mergner T, Siebold C, Schweigart G, Becker W (1991) Human perception of horizontal and head rotation in space. Exp Brain Res 85: 389–404PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Nakamura T, Bronstein AM (1995) The perception of head and neck angular displacement in normal and labyrinthine-defective subjects. A quantitative study using a ‘remembered saccade’ technique. Brain 118: 1157–1168PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Paillard J (1987) Cognitive versus sensorimotor encoding of spatial information. In: Ellen P, Thinus-Blanc C (eds) Cognitive processes and spatial orientation in animal and man. Martinus Nijhoff, Dordrecht, pp 1–34Google Scholar
  24. Roll R, Bard C, Paillard J (1986) Head orienting contributes to the directional accuracy of aiming at distant targets. Hum Movement Sei 5: 359–371CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Taylor JL, McCloskey DI (1988) Proprioception in the neck. Exp Brain Res 70: 351–360PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean Blouin
    • 1
  • Nicolas Amade
    • 1
  • Jean-Louis Vercher
    • 1
  • Gabriel Gauthier
    • 1
  1. 1.Movement and PerceptionCNRS and Université de la MéditerranéeMarseilleFrance

Personalised recommendations