Alloys and Compounds

  • Rolf E. Hummel


Pure materials have a number of inherent mechanical properties, as discussed in Chapter 3. These features, such as strength or ductility, can be altered only to a limited degree, for example, by work hardening. In contrast to this, the properties of materials can be varied significantly if one combines several elements, that is, by alloying. In this chapter, we shall unfold the multiplicity of the mechanical properties of alloys and compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanisms which are involved. Specifically, we shall discuss a number of techniques which increase the strength of materials. Among them are solid solution strengthening, precipitation hardening (age hardening), dispersion strengthening, and grain size strengthening. In order to understand these mechanisms, we need to study the fundamentals of phase diagrams.


Phase Diagram Rapid Solidification Eutectic Alloy Binary Phase Diagram Oxide Dispersion Strengthen 


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Suggestions for Further Study

  1. D.R. Askeland, The Science and Engineering of Materials, 3rd Edition, PWS Publishing Co., Boston (1994).Google Scholar
  2. W.D. Callister, Jr., Materials Science and Engineering, 4th Edition, Wiley, New York (1997).Google Scholar
  3. P. Haasen, Physikalische Metallkunde, 3rd Edition, Springer-Verlag, New York (1994).Google Scholar
  4. E. Hornbogen, Werkstoffe, 6th Edition, Springer-Verlag, New York (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. M. Ohring, Engineering Materials Science, Academic, New York (1995).Google Scholar
  6. R. Stevens, Zirconia and Zirconia Ceramics, Magnesium Electron Ltd., UK (1986).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rolf E. Hummel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and EngineeringUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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