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New Frontiers for Ethical Considerations: Artificial Intelligence, Cyberspace, and Virtual Reality

  • Joseph Migga Kizza
Part of the Undergraduate Texts in Computer Science book series (UTCS)

Abstract

Artificial intelligence (AI), cyberspace (CP), and virtual reality (VR) are all exciting technological frontiers offering novel environments with unlimited possibilities. The AI environment works with the possibilities of understanding and extending knowledge to create intelligent agents perhaps with a human-value base, intended to help solve human problems; the CP environment investigates the reality of the assumed presence of objects and peers: You know they are there but you do not know where or who “really” is out there; and the VR environment simulates the reality of “other worlds” through modeling and creating better tools for understanding the complexities of our world, thus moving humanity closer to the good life.

Keywords

Virtual Reality Transmission Control Protocol Autonomous Agent Intelligent Agent Human Intelligence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Migga Kizza
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and Electrical EngineeringUniversity of Tennessee at ChattanoogaChattanoogaUSA

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