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Menstrual Disorders

  • Eugene Felmar

Abstract

Among the most frequent and most puzzling complaints heard by the family physician are those of women with menstrual disorders. Regular menses is reassuring to patients, but menstrual irregularity or abnormality is of concern to both them and us. Frequent complaints include menarcheal delay, amenorrhea, menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, oligomenorrhea, polymenorrhea, and menstrual disorders of the perimenopause and menopause. Both patient and physician are concerned that abnormal bleeding may evidence a complication of developmental delay, gestation, or neoplasia.

Keywords

Endometrial Polyp Gonadal Dysgenesis Menstrual Disorder Secondary Amenorrhea Endometrial Ablation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene Felmar

There are no affiliations available

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