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Artificial Intelligence

  • Oliver Grillmeyer
Chapter
Part of the Undergraduate Texts in Computer Science book series (UTCS)

Abstract

Artificial intelligence is perhaps the most talked about field within computer science. This is not due to the number of researchers or proponents within the field, or to number of accomplishments. Artificial intelligence, or AI as it is usually referred to, is so popular because it is the most controversial field within computer science. AI is threatening to some people and exciting to others. Some say it is an idea that is a few years away from becoming reality, while others say it will never be a possibility. Some say ifs hip; others, hype. How can one field elicit such disparate beliefs? The answer lies in what AI attempts to do.

Keywords

Time Slot Expert System Natural Language Processing Goal State World Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Additional Reading

  1. Norvig, P. (1992). Paradigms of Artificial Intelligence Programming: Case Studies in Common LISP, Morgan Kaufmann, San Mateo, CA.Google Scholar
  2. Rich, E. and Knight, K. (1991). Artificial Intelligence, Second edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  3. Russell, S.J. and Norvig, P. (1995). Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.MATHGoogle Scholar
  4. Winston, P.H. (1992). Artificial Intelligence, Third edition, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA.Google Scholar

AI references and historical coverage

  1. Barr, A. and Feigenbaum, E.A., editors (1981). The Handbook of Artificial Intelligence, Volume 1, William Kaufman Inc., Los Altos, CA.MATHGoogle Scholar
  2. Barr, A. and Feigenbaum, E.A., editors (1982). The Handbook of Artificial Intelligence, Volume 2, William Kaufman Inc., Los Altos, CA.MATHGoogle Scholar
  3. Barr, A., Cohen, P.R., and Feigenbaum, E.A., editors (1989). The Handbook of Artificial Intelligence, Volume 4, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA.Google Scholar
  4. Cohen, P.R. and Feigenbaum, E.A., editors (1982). The Handbook of Artificial Intelligence, Volume 3, William Kaufman Inc., Los Altos, CA.MATHGoogle Scholar
  5. Shapiro, S.C., editor (1992). Encyclopedia of Artificial Intelligence, Second edition, Volumes 1 and 2, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY.Google Scholar

Books specific to AI subfields

  1. Gazdar, G. and Mellish, C.S. (1989). Natural Language Processing in LlSP: An Introduction to Computational Linguistics, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA.Google Scholar
  2. Horn, B.K.P. (1986). Robot vision, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  3. Marr, D. (1982). Vision: A Computational Investigation into the Human Representation and Processing of Visual Information, W.H. Freeman, San Francisco, CA.Google Scholar
  4. Murray, R.M., Li, Z., and Sastry, S.S. (1994). A Mathematical Introduction to Robotic Manipulation, CRC Press, Boca Raton.MATHGoogle Scholar
  5. Parsaye, K. and Chignell, M. (1988). Expert Systems for Experts, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  6. Schank, R.C. and Riesbeck, C.K. (1981). Inside Computer Understanding: Five Programs Plus Miniatures, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Hillsdale, NJ.Google Scholar
  7. Waterman, D.A. (1986). A Guide to Expert Systems, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA.Google Scholar

Philosophical issues

  1. Dreyfus, H.L. (1992). What Computers Still Can’t Do: A Critique of Artificial Reason, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
  2. Hofstadter, D.R. and Dennett, D.C. (1981). The Mind’s I, Basic Books, New York, NY.MATHGoogle Scholar
  3. Minsky, M.L. (1986). The Society of Mind, Simon and Schuster, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  4. Penrose, R. (1989). The Emperor’s New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics, Oxford University Press, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  5. Searle, J.R. (1984). Minds, Brains, and Science, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oliver Grillmeyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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