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Phencyclidine

  • A. James Giannini
Chapter

Abstract

Phencyclidine (PCP) is the most common member of the “dissociatives.” The dissociatives constitute an entirely synthetic class of drugs that act at multiple receptor sites. They act as agonists or antagonists at cholinergic, dopaminergic, noradrenergic, opioid, serotonergic, sigma, and NDMA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) -high-affinity and -low-affinity receptor sites. As a result, dissociatives can mimic atropinic, GABAminergic, opioid, psychedelic, and sympathomimetic drugs. Since the drugs in this class are active in powdered, crystalline, suspended, and volatile forms, they can be ingested, snorted, injected, smoked, or inhaled (Giannini, 1987b).

Keywords

Anesthetic Effect Sigma Receptor Clinical Toxicology Dopaminergic Effect Conceptual Disorganization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. James Giannini
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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