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Community-Based Partnership-Directed Research

Actualizing Community Strengths to Treat Child Victims of Physical Abuse and Neglect
  • John Fantuzzo
  • Andrea Delgaudio Weiss
  • Kathleen Coyle Coolahan
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

During the last two decades of the 20th century, the number of children reported abused or neglected has risen steadily. Nearly 3 million children were involved in maltreatment reports in 1993 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1995). Demographic data indicate that the likelihood of victimization is not equal for all children. The child victims of maltreatment are disproportionately young and from low-income households (Wolfner & Gelles, 1993). Fifty-one percent of the children reported abused or neglected in 1993 were 7 years old or younger, and almost one-third were between the ages of 3 and 7 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1995). Repeatedly, national incidence studies have indicated a strong relationship between low-income levels and a higher-than-average risk of child maltreatment (Pelton, 1994).

Keywords

Child Abuse Head Start Child Physical Abuse Play Session Child Victim 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Fantuzzo
    • 1
  • Andrea Delgaudio Weiss
    • 1
  • Kathleen Coyle Coolahan
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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