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Implementing and Evaluating an Individualized Behavioral Intervention Program for Maltreating Families

Clinical and Research Issues
  • David J. Hansen
  • Jody E. Warner-Rogers
  • Debra B. Hecht
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Child abuse and neglect is a multidimensional problem that requires comprehensive, individualized treatment. The multiproblem nature of maltreating families presents many assessment and treatment difficulties for clinicians and researchers. A variety of factors contribute to difficulties in treating these families, including (1) the presence of multiple stressors and limited financial, personal, and social resources within the family for coping with stressors, (2) the often coercive nature of the referral and the possibility that participation in services may be involuntary or under duress, (3) the fact that abusive behavior cannot be readily observed, and (4) the need for many different interventions to treat several target areas (Azar & Wolfe, 1989; Hansen & Warner, 1992, 1994; Wolfe, 1988). Abusive and neglectful families are a very heterogeneous group for which individualized intervention approaches are needed.

Keywords

Child Abuse Child Behavior Parent Training Child Behavior Problem Child Protective Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Hansen
    • 1
  • Jody E. Warner-Rogers
    • 2
  • Debra B. Hecht
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of NebraskaLincolnUSA
  2. 2.MRC Child Psychiatry UnitLondonEngland

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