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Implications for Child Abuse and Neglect Interventions from Early Educational Interventions

  • Barbara Hanna Wasik
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Family impoverishment as evidenced by low income, low educational levels, and unemployment is the strongest predictor of poor developmental outcomes for children. Two domains in particular, school failure and abuse and neglect, are highly associated with poverty and have been at the center of many prevention and intervention efforts during the past three decades. Separate groups and organizations, however, have worked independently to address these two concerns about children. Predictably, most of the attention to reducing school failure originated in the fields of education and child development, where the goals are to enhance children’s cognitive development and school performance. By contrast, the attention to reducing abuse and neglect derived from social services and health organizations, and aims to protect the child from further abuse and neglect, provide treatment and, more recently, develop prevention strategies. In addition to being influenced by different professions and different objectives for the child, these two areas of concern have also been characterized by different intervention procedures.

Keywords

Child Development Child Outcome Early Intervention Program Disadvantaged Child Early Childhood Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Hanna Wasik
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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