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Mood Management

The Role of Processing Strategies in Affect Control and Affect Infusion
  • Joseph P. Forgas
  • Robert Johnson
  • Joseph Ciarrochi
Part of the The Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

The dual nature of the human mind, comprising a combination of rational and emotional characteristics, has been a source of fascination to philosophers and laymen since time immemorial (Hilgard, 1980). How does affect influence a person’s cognitive processes, and how does cognition impact on affective states? Although this question lies at the heart of understanding personal control, it has only been the focus of determined scientific study for the past few decades or so. Yet popular interest in affect control has never been higher. Bookshops are filled with popular psychology titles offering us advice on how to improve our self-worth by thinking positively, get a better sex life by emotional empowerment, or make a fortune by feeling good about ourselves. These books sell because people want to believe that they can influence their own feelings, thoughts, and desires. just what is the role of affect and mood in influencing our thoughts and behaviors? What are the circumstances that lead to an accentuation or an attenuation of a prevailing mood state? And just how effective are various cognitive strategies in influencing our affective states? This chapter will review some of the available evidence for spontaneous affect infusion into social judgments and behaviors, and will also consider the complementary role of controlled, motivated processing in producing affect control. A general theory of mood management based on our recent Affect Infusion Model (Forgas, 1995a) will be outlined.

Keywords

Affective State Processing Strategy Negative Mood Personal Control Motivate Processing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph P. Forgas
    • 1
  • Robert Johnson
    • 1
  • Joseph Ciarrochi
    • 1
  1. 1.School of PsychologyUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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