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Uncontrollability as a Source of Cognitive Exhaustion

Implications for Helplessness and Depression
  • Miroslaw Kofta
  • Grzegorz Sedek
Part of the The Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

In the last three decades, a psychological response to circumstances that jeopardize human striving for control has emerged as a prominent topic in psychological inquiry. Researchers increasingly have asked how loss of control affects human motivation, mood, and cognitive processing. In addition, attention has been directed to the effects of loss of control on psychological well-being, adaptation, and interpersonal relationships.

Keywords

Dual Task Negative Life Event Mental Arithmetic Learn Helplessness Counterfactual Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Miroslaw Kofta
    • 1
  • Grzegorz Sedek
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of PsychologyUniversity of WarsawWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Faculty of PsychologyUniversity of Warsaw and Polish Academy of ScienceWarsawPoland

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