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The Control and Operation of Distributed Generation in a Competitive Electric Market

  • Judith B. Cardell
  • Marija Ilić
Chapter
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (PEPS)

Abstract

Small scale power generating technologies, such as gas turbines, small hydro turbines, photovoltaics, wind turbines and fuel cells, are gradually replacing conventional generating technologies in various applications, in the electric power system. These distributed technologies have many benefits, such as high fuel efficiency, short construction lead time, modular installation, and low capital expense, which all contribute to their growing popularity. The prospect of independent ownership for distributed and other new generators, as encouraged by the current deregulation of the generation sector, further broadens their appeal. In addition, the industry restructuring process is moving the power sector in general away from the traditional vertical integration and cost-based regulation and toward increased exposure to market forces. Competitive structures for generation and alternative regulatory structures for transmission and distribution are emerging from this restructuring process.

Keywords

Power System Wind Turbine Distribution System Steam Turbine Price Signal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith B. Cardell
    • 1
  • Marija Ilić
    • 2
  1. 1.Office of Economic PolicyFederal Energy Regulatory CommissionUSA
  2. 2.Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer ScienceMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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