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Epidemiology and Aging

  • Sylvia E. Furner
  • Jacob A. Brody
  • Linda M. Jankowski

Abstract

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, staggering changes have occurred in the size, age structure, health profile, and health care utilization patterns of the United States population. The size of the population has more than tripled.1,2 The population has aged; persons 65 years of age and over make up almost 13% of the total population, more than three times what it was in 1900. Today more than 70% of the population live to the traditional retirement age of 65. In 1900, only 25% of the population lived that long.3 Longevity has increased at an astounding rate.4 The predominant disease pattern is chronic illness, in contrast to infectious disease or disease due to poor living conditions, and medical care utilization is now greatest during the last years of life.3

Keywords

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Black Male Crude Death Rate National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Health Resource Utilization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sylvia E. Furner
  • Jacob A. Brody
  • Linda M. Jankowski

There are no affiliations available

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