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Ecology of Small Mammals in Prairie Landscapes

  • Glennis A. Kaufman
  • Donald W. Kaufman
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 125)

Abstract

When one crosses the prairie landscapes of central North America, one becomes aware of the impacts that humans have had on the region. Recent anthropogenic modifications of the presettlement prairie not only have changed vegetation but also altered distributional ranges, spatial use within ranges, and total numbers of many species of animals. Although human activities often reduce ranges and abundances of animals and these reductions usually are the foci of issues of conservation, human impacts do not always lead to such reductions. Anthropogenic changes can and do lead to increases in numbers, distributional ranges, or both for some species. Some of these increases result from altered landscapes that provide conditions more suitable for some species than the conditions available in native environments. Other increases are due to intentional introductions of both domestic and wild species and to accidental introductions of wild species.

Keywords

Small Mammal Ground Squirrel Tallgrass Prairie Deer Mouse Prairie Vole 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Glennis A. Kaufman
  • Donald W. Kaufman

There are no affiliations available

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