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Children and Families Coping with Disaster

  • Conway F. Saylor
  • Ronald Belter
  • Sherri J. Stokes
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

A unique environment in which to capture the effects of stress and coping in children is the aftermath of disaster. At a basic level the disaster environment provides an opportunity to learn how essentially well-adjusted children and families cope with the short- and long-term effects of a sudden, unanticipated, monumental set of stressors. At an applied level, there is a compelling and widespread need for supportive interventions throughout the stages of the disaster and its aftermath if psychological sequelae are to be minimized. The purposes of this chapter are: to define disaster as it pertains to children and families; to examine the nature of stressors associated with various types of disasters; to highlight key findings from the growing literature on disaster’s impact on children; to review recent literature pertaining specifically to stress and coping by children in disasters; and to introduce intervention techniques that have been developed to minimize the ill effects of disasters on their young victims.

Keywords

Natural Disaster Ptsd Symptom Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Child Psychiatry Disaster Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conway F. Saylor
    • 1
  • Ronald Belter
    • 2
  • Sherri J. Stokes
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe CitadelCharlestonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of West FloridaPensacolaUSA
  3. 3.New Hope Treatment CenterCharlestonUSA

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