The Nexus of Culture and Sensory Loss

Coping with Deafness
  • Mark T. Greenberg
  • Liliana J. Lengua
  • Rosemary Calderon
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

The development and adaptation of deaf children and their families is an area of study that is fascinating and complex. Having a significant hearing loss may have radically different consequences for the child and his or her family, depending on such factors as the hearing status of the child’s parents, the etiology of deafness, the age at which deafness occurred, the type of communication approach(es) adopted by the family, the type of schooling that is selected, and the amount and nature of contact that both the deaf child and his or her parents have with other deaf children and adults. All of these factors (and more) will influence how the child and family perceive deafness and its social, educational, and vocational consequences.

Keywords

Depression Covariance Income Assimilation Nash 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark T. Greenberg
    • 1
  • Liliana J. Lengua
    • 2
  • Rosemary Calderon
    • 3
  1. 1.Human Development and Family StudiesPenn State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryChildren’s Hospital Medical Center (CHMC)SeattleUSA

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