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Cereals pp 251-255 | Cite as

Neuronal and Experimental Methodology to Improve Malt Quality

  • Myriam Fliss
  • Francoise Maurel
  • Jean Louis Delatte
  • Joseph Boudrant
  • Marie-Christine Suhner
  • Marc Gabriel
Chapter

Abstract

The aim of the malting process is to produce malt, which is homogeneous, by modifying barley as efficiently as possible. It begins with the steeping of barley in water to achieve a moisture level sufficient to activate the metabolism of germination, leading to the development of hydrolytic enzymes. After a period of germination where even modification is achieved, the green malt is kilned to arrest germination and stabilize the malt. Then, colour and aroma of the malt are developed during this phase. The malting process lasts 8 or 9 days. Malt in turn becomes the raw material of the brewery. Brewers’ malt specifications and quality requirements are becoming progressively more demanding. The maltster should then be able to predict the influence of the malting process on the quality of malt when selecting barley. However, barley quality is affected by the genotype, the environment under which it is grown and the effectiveness of selection programmes.

Keywords

Experimental Methodology Barley Variety Industrial Data Malt Quality Pilot Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Myriam Fliss
    • 1
    • 2
  • Francoise Maurel
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jean Louis Delatte
    • 1
  • Joseph Boudrant
    • 2
  • Marie-Christine Suhner
    • 3
  • Marc Gabriel
    • 3
  1. 1.Malteries Soufflet, Quai SarrailNogent sur SeineFrance
  2. 2.CNRS - LSGCVandoeuvre les NancyFrance
  3. 3.CRAM IMVandoeuvre les NancyFrance

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