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Cereals pp 69-77 | Cite as

Cereal Starches

Properties in Relation to Industrial Uses
  • A. Lynn
  • R. D. M. Prentice
  • M. P. Cochrane
  • A. M. Cooper
  • F. Dale
  • C. M. Duffus
  • R. P. Ellis
  • I. M. Morrison
  • L. Paterson
  • J. S. Swanston
  • S. A. Tiller
Chapter

Abstract

Starch is the second most abundant biopolymer after cellulose. It is synthesised by plants, stored in organs such as seeds and tubers, and subsequently used as an energy source during germination and growth. Starch is stored in distinct granules, the carbohydrates in these granules comprising two polydisperse polymers, amylose and amylopectin. Both of these polymers are composed of α-D-glucopyranose subunits. Amylose is an essentially linear polymer with the subunits being connected by α-(1→→4)-linkages. Amylopectin is a highly branched polymer in which the subunits are connected by α-(1→4)-linkages, and the branches are attached to the linear chains by α-(1→6)-linkages.

Keywords

Starch Granule Potato Starch Wheat Starch Gelatinisation Temperature Maize Starch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Lynn
    • 1
  • R. D. M. Prentice
    • 2
  • M. P. Cochrane
    • 2
  • A. M. Cooper
    • 3
  • F. Dale
    • 3
  • C. M. Duffus
    • 2
  • R. P. Ellis
    • 3
  • I. M. Morrison
    • 3
  • L. Paterson
    • 2
  • J. S. Swanston
    • 3
  • S. A. Tiller
    • 3
  1. 1.Food Science and Technology DepartmentSACAuchincruive, AyrUK
  2. 2.Crop Science and Technology DepartmentSACEdinburghUK
  3. 3.Scottish Crop Research InstituteInvergowrie, DundeeUK

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