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Informed Clinical Practice and the Standard of Care

Proposed Guidelines for the Treatment of Adults Who Report Delayed Memories of Childhood Trauma
  • Christine A. Courtois
  • D. Stephen Lindsay
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 291)

Abstract

The impetus for this paper comes from two different but related professional initiatives: 1) the development of guidelines and scientifically validated standards of practice and 2) the treatment of adults who report delayed memory for past trauma, especially child sexual abuse. The purpose of the paper is the articulation of guidelines for the informed treatment of adults who report childhood trauma. Special attention is devoted to clinical issues that arise when the patient reports new (delayed, recovered, re-instated) memories of abuse during the course of therapy; suspects past trauma/abuse on the basis of recovered or delayed memories that occur within or outside of therapy; or suspects past trauma/abuse in the absence of specific recollections.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Childhood Sexual Abuse False Memory Adult Survivor Childhood Trauma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christine A. Courtois
    • 1
  • D. Stephen Lindsay
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.The Center: Posttraumatic Disorders ProgramThe Psychiatric Institute of WashingtonUSA
  2. 2.University of WalesBangorUK
  3. 3.University of VictoriaCanada

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