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Hypnosis, Pseudomemories, and Clinical Guidelines

A Sociocognitive Perspective
  • Steven Jay Lynn
  • Bryan Myers
  • Peter Malinoski
  • Willem A. Wagenaar
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 291)

Abstract

Hypnosis has never been far from the center of controversy. Indeed, hypnosis has been intimately associated with historical debates concerning the nature of hysteria, dissociation, repression, and now, memory (see Lynn, Rhue, & Spanos, 1994). While hypnosis is currently riding an unprecedented wave of popularity among clinicians, and while researchers are moving hypnosis forward into the mainstream of psychology, debate rages in the hypnosis and broader psychological community about the role and potential usefulness of hypnosis in memory retrieval (Loftus & Ketcham, 1994; Lindsay & Read, 1995; Lynn & Nash, 1994).

Keywords

False Memory Traumatic Memory Abnormal Psychology Early Memory Memory Distortion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Jay Lynn
    • 1
  • Bryan Myers
    • 1
  • Peter Malinoski
    • 2
  • Willem A. Wagenaar
    • 3
  1. 1.State University of New York at BinghamtonBinghamtonUSA
  2. 2.Ohio UniversityAthensUSA
  3. 3.Leiden UniversityThe Netherlands

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