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Field and Laboratory Investigations

  • Robert M. Sorensen

Abstract

The coastal zone—where the land, sea, and air meet—is one of the most complex areas for conducting civil engineering analysis and design. Owing to the nature of the coastal zone, most coastal engineering analysis and design procedures have a partial or complete empirical basis. This empirical basis must be developed and continually improved through extensive field, and in some cases, laboratory investigations.

Keywords

Wave Height Surf Zone Suspended Load Coastal Engineer Sediment Transport Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Sorensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

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