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Coastal Zone Processes

  • Robert M. Sorensen

Abstract

The zone of interest in this chapter is that segment of the coast located between the offshore point where shoaling waves begin to move sediment and the onshore limit of active marine processes. The latter is usually delineated by a dune field or cliff line, unless a line of structures is constructed along the coast. Most of the world’s coastlines consist of sandy beaches. In some locations the beach is covered partially or completely with coarser stone known as shingle. Many shorelines consist of long beaches occasionally interrupted be a river, tidal inlet, or rocky headland. In other locations there are short pocket beaches between large headlands that limit the interchange of sediment between adjacent beaches.

Keywords

Transport Rate Surf Zone Shoreline Change Coastal Engineer Beach Profile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Sorensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

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