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Wave Refraction, Diffraction, and Reflection

  • Robert M. Sorensen

Abstract

Consider the design of a protective breakwater for a small marina that is located on the open coast. A typical design concern would be to predict wave conditions at interior points in the marina (where vessels will be moored) for a given deep water design wave height, period, and direction. There must be an analysis of the change in wave height owing to the change in relative depth from deep water to the marina interior (as discussed in Chapters 2 and 3). We must also evaluate the effects of refraction on wave height and crest orientation as the wave propagates over the nearshore bottom contours from deep water to the vicinity of the marina. Then the effects of diffraction and possibly further refraction as the wave propagates into the lee of the marina breakwater must be evaluated. The combined effects of shoaling, refraction, and diffraction will yield the resulting wave height and direction of propagation pattern within the marina. If any of the interior borders of the marina (e.g., vertical bulkheads and quay walls) have a high reflection coefficient, reflected waves may also be active at the points of interest.

Keywords

Wave Height Wave Diffraction Wave Crest Coastal Engineer Wave Refraction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Sorensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

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