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Finite-Amplitude Waves

  • Robert M. Sorensen

Abstract

The small-amplitude wave theory was formulated as a solution to the Laplace equation with the required surface (two) and bottom (one) boundary conditions [Eqs. (2.1), (2.3), (2.4), and (2.6)]. But the two surface boundary conditions had to be linearized and then applied at the still water level rather than at the water surface. This requires that H/d and H/L be small compared to unity. Consequently, the small-amplitude wave theory can be applied over the complete range of relative water depths (d/L), but it is limited to waves of relatively small amplitude relative to the water depth (for shallow water waves) and wave length (for deep water waves).

Keywords

Solitary Wave Wave Height Wave Theory Wave Crest Wave Steepness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Sorensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

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