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Carbohydrate/Emulsifier Interactions

  • Lynn B. Deffenbaugh

Abstract

Many different types of emulsifiers are used in food products. The inclusion rate is usually low, < 3%. Composition and characteristics of emulsifiers used in foods are discussed in other chapters. Emulsifiers often function indirectly in foods by modifying the properties of major components such as carbohydrates, protein, or fat. This chapter discusses the impact of emulsifiers on carbohydrates.

Keywords

Electron Spin Resonance Inclusion Complex Starch Granule Sodium Lauryl Sulfate Wheat Starch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

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  • Lynn B. Deffenbaugh

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