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Stock Exchange Governance in the European Union

  • Guido Ferrarini
Part of the Financial and Monetary Policy Studies book series (FMPS, volume 33)

Abstract

Stock exchanges are generally viewed as a type of firm that produces ‘transaction services’. They facilitate transactions between buyers and sellers of securities by providing either a centralized location for trades to take place or an electronic system to perform the same function.1 Thus, the primary benefit of exchanges is that they save traders the cost of independently searching for someone on the other side of the transaction.2 Another benefit is that exchanges produce information, as reflected in the prices of the instruments traded on them.3

Keywords

Stock Exchange Royal Decree London Stock Exchange Market Authority Supervisory Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guido Ferrarini

There are no affiliations available

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